Immaculata University Announces June Workshops

Immaculata University will offer on-campus undergraduate workshops for personal and professional development during the month of June.
DRAWING AND WATERCOLOR PAINTING: FLOWERS AT LONGWOOD GARDENS. This is a hands-on workshop investigating basic drawing skills and techniques using watercolor. Students are required to bring pencils, sketchbook, and a tube set of watercolors to the first class. On Friday, June 6, from 5:00 to 9:30 p.m. students work in the classroom based on observations of plants and flowers. On Saturday, June 7, from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., students meet at Longwood Gardens where they have the opportunity to paint and draw flowers from the gardens. Leanne Grimes leads this class. The cost is $380 for one credit or $170 for non-credit.
MUTUAL FUND BASICS. Mutual funds are often overlooked when investors consider their various investment options. The rule of thumb in investing is diversification which allows for investment risk to be spread over numerous investments. This workshop analyzes mutual fund theory so that potential investors gain an understanding of the pros and cons of purchasing shares of a mutual fund. The different types of mutual funds, the costs associated with mutual funds, and how to evaluate different types of funds will be explained. Reagan Garey, Ph.D., will lead this workshop on Friday, June 6, from 6:00 to 9:30 p.m. and Saturday, June 7, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The cost is $380 for one credit or $170 for non-credit.
LEGEND OF DUFFY´S CUT. This course explores the history, folklore, and archaeology of Duffy´s Cut, a mass grave of Irish workers dating from 1832 and located near Immaculata. This site has been investigated by a team from Immaculata´s History Department and was granted an official State Historical Marker by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. Students explore the site´s importance in the story of Irish immigration to Pennsylvania, experience the local railroad lore, learn about the ghastly ghost stories from the site, and observe first-hand the investigative techniques used by the History Department team. The course includes a visit to the site of the historical marker. William Watson, Ph.D., leads this course on Friday, June 6, from 6:00 – 10:00 p.m. and continues on Saturday, June 7, from 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. The cost is $380 for one credit or $170 for non-credit.
PHILOSOPHY OF HUMAN IDENTITY I. The concept of human identity has its roots in ancient Greek philosophers´ ideas of general identity. This study of the writings of Pre-Socratics such as the Atomists and Heraclitus shows the development of the concept of self in terms of space, time, unity, and multiplicity. Plato´s and Aristotle´s spiritual conceptions of the soul are traced, especially as they impact medieval thought. Excerpts from Greek philosophers and philosophers of the Patristic period are read, examined, and discussed. Bruno Garofalo leads this class on Friday, June 6, from 5:00 to 9:00 p.m. and on Saturday, June 7, from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. The cost is $380 for one credit or $170 for non-credit.
DANCE AND DRUM. Non-verbal communication is one of the strongest forces in human interaction. It enables us to send messages, state belief systems, organize rituals, and signify ailments. Uniquely embedded in all cultures is the ability to express meaning non-verbally. The modalities of music therapy and dance therapy are integrated in this workshop, allowing students to identify and direct specific non-verbal communication. Florence Ierardi, MA, MT-BC and Mark Bottos, MCAT, DTR, will lead this course on Saturday, June 7, from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and Sunday, June 8, from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. The cost is $380 for one credit or $170 for non-credit.
HUMAN LOVE IN THE DIVINE PLAN. This course examines John Paul II´s "Theology of the Body." It considers how the human body, male and female, makes visible God´s invisible mystery and reflects God´s self-giving, creative love. It explores how humans fulfill the meaning of their existence by living according to the truth of their sexuality. June Matwijec will teach this course on Saturdays, June 7 and 21, from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. The cost is $380 for one credit or $170 for non-credit.
LISTENING SKILLS. Why do some employees seem more satisfied than others? Effective listening may be the key. This practical workshop teaches how to listen more effectively, how to respond to consumer complaints, resolve conflict, negotiate successfully with difficult people, create a team with your boss and colleagues, produce higher quality work, and become a more valuable professional. Gail Froggatt leads this class on Saturdays, June 7 and 14, from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. The cost is $380 for one credit or $170 for non-credit.
RESUME WRITING. In this workshop, students research ads and identify requested skill sets, create persuasive lead lines, and write a convincing cover letter. The result will be a professional resume necessary to open the right doors. Stacy L. Linkins leads this workshop on Wednesday, June 11, Thursday, June 12, and Wednesday, June 18, from 5:00 to 9:00 p.m. The cost is $380 for one credit or $170 for non-credit.
UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM OF ARCHEOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY. This museum features collections from Egypt, China, and Mesopotamia. Other highlights include important Greco-Roman antiquities, Buddhist art, a distinguished collection of African art, and an array of Mayan and other Pre-Columbian pieces. Students are introduced to different cultures and time periods and how art and artifacts were influenced by or created in support of religious and societal aims. Students meet at Immaculata on Friday, June 13, from 5:00 to 9:30 p.m., for an overview of the art to be viewed. On Saturday, June 14, students meet from 9:30 to 4:30 p.m. at the museum. John Meehan instructs this course. The cost is $380 for one credit or $170 for non-credit.
PHILOSOPHY OF HUMAN IDENTITY II. After a general introduction of identity, Rene Descartes´ theory of human identity, specifically his mind-body dualism, is considered. A study of John Locke´s work will show how human identity is seen as a constantly changing physical and psychological process that evolves over time. Locke´s contemporary, Bishop Butler, offers varying ideas of consciousness, and singles out memory as the relevant factor that bears the burden of identity. Bruno Garofalo leads this class on Friday, June 13, from 5:00 – 9:00 p.m. and on Saturday, June 14, from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. The cost is $380 for one credit or $170 for non-credit.
PSYCHOLOGICAL DISORDERS IN FILM. Join this dynamic class exploring personality disorders as expressed in contemporary film. Students compare and contrast specific movie character portrayals to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Character portrayals of (Axis II) personality disorders will be investigated, including antisocial, borderline and narcissistic personality disorders. Tracy Hill leads this class on Fridays, June 13, from 5:00 to 9:00 p.m. and on Saturday, June 14, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. The cost is $380 for one credit or $170 for non-credit.
PHILOSOPHY OF HUMAN IDENTITY III. John Locke´s theory of human identity depends on a physical and psychological connection that links a person during different temporal stages of life. Critics argue that Locke´s theory violates elementary laws of logic. Contemporary philosophers posit that human identity must include the verification of the external world and recognition from other people. This course considers human identity as well as the concepts of survival and global identity. Bruno Garofalo will lead this class on Friday, June 20, from 5:00 to 9:00 p.m. and on Saturday, June 21, from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. The cost is $380 for one credit or $170 for non-credit.
INVESTIGATIVE PROCEDURES. In this course, students are introduced to interviewing methods and the development of informants and cooperating witnesses in criminal cases. Students learn to appreciate the importance of forensics, surveillance, wiretapping and listening devices which are tools to establishing probable cause. The importance of liaison with local and federal agencies is stressed. Carl S. Wallace leads this workshop on Friday, June 20, from 6:00 to 10:00 p.m. and on Saturday, June 21, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. The cost is $380 for one credit or $170 for non-credit.
WRITING WORKSHOP. In this course, students work on improving their writing, concentrating on expository writing beyond the basic writing skills level. This course is offered on Saturdays, June 21 and 28, from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. The cost is $380 for one credit or $170 for non-credit.
WORLD CULTURES. This course introduces the main features of non-western civilizations and traditions. Students whose course work has focused on western civilization learn to appreciate diversity in a global community. Jeffrey Short, Ph.D., will instruct this class on Saturdays, June 21 and 28, from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. The cost is $380 for one credit or $170 for non-credit.
PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM OF ART – I. This seminar explores the expansive collection of American and European art at the PMA. Since its founding in 1876, the museum has acquired major examples of art. The first part of the tour includes works by American artists Thomas Eakins, Mary Cassatt, Homer, Tanner, and A. Warhol. The second part of the tour looks at the Renaissance and Baroque Periods of art. Students meet on Friday, June 20, from 5:00 – 9:00 p.m., at Immaculata for an overview of the works to be viewed at the museum and to engage in "hands-on" experiences, trying techniques used by masters. On Saturday, June 21, from 9:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m., the class meets at the entrance to the museum. The cost is $380 for one credit or $170 for non-credit.
For further information about these courses, please contact the College of LifeLong Learning at 610-647-4400, ext. 3241.
Immaculata University, a Catholic, coeducational institution, is located 20 miles west of Philadelphia, south of the intersection of routes 30 and 352, between Paoli and Exton.

y:Public Relations/News Releases 2007-2008/June Workshops #120
5.7.2008

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