Theresa Major Payton
Aug15

Theresa Major Payton

In 2006, the White House extended an invitation to Payton to serve as the first woman Chief Information Officer at the White House. Her duties included setting the business and technology information management strategy and direction as part of the Office Administration for the Executive Office of the President. She managed the technology that supports the 3,000 staff members that support the Executive Office of the President both at...

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Courtnie Williams
Aug15

Courtnie Williams

[icon name="icon-print"] Printer Friendly Even athletes who claim they’re not superstitious have lucky numbers. So why should singers and musicians be any different? For Courtnie Williams ‘09, that fateful digit would be #113514, the number on the tag she wore for her “American Idol” audition in Philadelphia. Earlier this year, Williams—who earned a degree in music/vocal performance from Immaculata—made it into the top 42 at the...

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Mike Ventola
Aug15

Mike Ventola

[icon name="icon-print"] Printer Friendly Mike Ventola is living his dream. Only two years after earning his degree in communication from Immaculata, Ventola has already landed a baseball job as media relations director and on-air radio voice for the Miners, an Independent League team that plays home games at Rent One Park in Marion, IL. “Last summer, my job had me calling all 96 games, home and away,” said Ventola from St. Louis,...

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Angela Steel
Aug15

Angela Steel

[icon name="icon-print"] Printer Friendly Angela Steel ‘06, vice president, Infectious Diseases, for GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), earned her master’s in organization leadership from Immaculata, and she refers to the experience in terms usually reserved for more esoteric studies. “It is a transformational program,” she said. “At its very core is learning what I can do to know myself better—how I can change—realizing that, ultimately, you...

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Family Affair
Aug15

Family Affair

[icon name="icon-print"] Printer Friendly Two stone sculptures, one white and one black, stand in the Rollisons’ family room. The black statue is of a man with gargantuan hands upraised, cupping an infant, as if receiving a gift. The white statue is a clump of two parents and two children, the wide, comb-like hands of the adults enclosing the children in a protective embrace. Sandra Rollison, who worked in undergraduate admissions and...

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