Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology Courses

For more information about course requirements, or to be assigned an academic advisor, please contact Collette Delaney at cdelaney@immaculata.edu or ext. 3509.

Prerequisites

Required for students admitted with a bachelor's degree, or a master's degree in a field unrelated to psychology, or at the department's recommendation.

PSYC 668              Counseling Theories and Techniques I

PSYC 669              Counseling Theories and Techniques II

Core (9 credits)

GEN 701                Human Development

GEN 702                Methods of Research

PSYC 790              Dissertation Research Seminar

PSYC 797              Comprehensive Examination

Required Concentration (108 credits)

PSYC 604              Group Process

PSYC 606              Family Counseling

PSYC 607              Treatment of Children and Adolescents

PSYC 608              Psychopathology

PSYC 663              Psychometrics

PSYC 664              Assessment I: Cognitive

PSYC 695              Clinical Psychology and Practicum Seminar

PSYC 700              Biological Bases of Behavior

PSYC 701              Cognitive and Affective Bases of Behavior

PSYC 702              Professional Issues and Ethics

PSYC 710              Cognitive and Behavioral Theories and Therapies

PSYC 711              Psychoanalytic Theories and Therapies

PSYC 712              Client-Centered and Relationship Theories and Therapies

PSYC 713              History and Systems in Psychology

PSYC 718              Applied Statistical Analysis for Behavior Science

PSYC 720              Gender Psychology

PSYC 721              Psychology of Human Diversity

PSYC 722              Human Sexuality and Dysfunctions

PSYC 730              Assessment IV: Advanced Skills

PSYC 731              Assessment V: Neuropsychological

PSYC 740              Clinical Psychopharmacology

PSYC 741              Clinical Supervision, Consultation, and Management

PSYC 745              Social Psychology

PSYC 765              Assessment II: Personality

PSYC 766              Advanced Neuropsychology*

PSYC 767              Advanced Clinical Psychology and Practicum Seminar

PSYC 768              Forensic Psychology

PSYC 780              Diagnostic Practicum and Seminar I

PSYC 781              Diagnostic Practicum and Seminar II

PSYC 782              Psychotherapy Practicum and Seminar I

PSYC 783              Psychotherapy Practicum and Seminar II

PSYC 786              Internship in Clinical Psychology I

PSYC 787              Internship in Clinical Psychology II

PSYC 788              Internship in Clinical Psychology III

PSYC 791              Internship in Clinical Psychology IV

PSYC 792              Internship in Clinical Psychology V

PSYC 793              Internship in Clinical Psychology VI

PSYC 798              Doctoral Dissertation I

PSYC 799              Doctoral Dissertation II

PSYC 800              Doctoral Dissertation III

PSYC 000              Dissertation Continuation

* Students eligible for the M.A. in Clinical Psychology must take either PSYC 766 or PSYC 768.  Permission of the chair is required to take both classes. Students not eligible for the M.A. in Clinical Psychology must take PSYC 766 and PSYC 768.

PSYC 786, 787, 788, 791, 792, 793: Students work with the coordinator of the predoctoral internship and practicum to prepare their application and identify internship sites.  The full-time internship involves a national application pool for placement slots and is highly competitive.

 

Course Descriptions

PSYC 668-669 Counseling Theories and Techniques I & II (3, 3)

These courses provide a historical review and evaluation of relevant theories of personality and psychotherapy, including psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, and humanistic theories. Counseling attitudes and strategies, including applying theory and technique to child, adolescent and adult populations as well as clients with varying multicultural backgrounds, are reviewed. Students are trained in interviewing skills, case formulation, rapport-building and self-reflection. (Prerequisite: a course in Personality, GEN 503; PSYC 607 or PSYC 608)

GEN 701 Human Development (3)

This course covers some of the major concepts and lines of research and inquiry within the field of human development, mainly from a theoretical perspective and research based perspective. Development is considered as an overarching construct with which to view cognition, affect, social relatedness, etc. Recent theorists and researchers are studied especially for their clinical relevance. Issues related to diversity will be addressed specifically throughout the course.

GEN 702 Methods of Research (3)

This course is designed to assist the student in refining basic, and developing advanced, understanding of research concepts and methods. Methodological issues covered include strategies for literature review; sampling and subject selection; ethics; internal and external validity, program evaluation, selection of appropriate measures; procedures; writing style; and APA publication style. Methodological approaches to both qualitative and quantitative research are discussed. Students also explore and develop their own research interests and contributions to their field. Students choose, study and discuss research covering a variety of clinical settings; populations; and cultural groups and concerns. (Prerequisite: undergraduate statistics)

PSYC 790 Dissertation Research Seminar (3)
This seminar is designed to prepare students for beginning the disserta- tion in the Fall semesters. Students review the Dissertation Handbook, including dissertation requirements, formatting, information technology, committee selection, ethical issues in research and the department’s timeline for completing the dissertation process. Students work in semi- nar format to refine dissertation topics and methodology, and complete a dissertation proposal prospectus. Grading is "Pass" or "Fail." Students take PSYC 790 in the spring semester and must then register for their first section of dissertation (PSYC 798) in the summer semester. Open only to Psy.D. students in Clinical Psychology (Clinical Psychology prerequisite: PSYC 781)

PSYC 797 Comprehensive Examination in Psychology (0)

A culminating experience which assesses the student’s ability to synthesize and integrate knowledge. Eligibility for the Comprehensive Examination requires as prerequisites:
Clinical Psychology Students:
* GEN 701 and 702; PSYC 663 and 718
* PSYC 604, 606, 607, 608, 664, 700, 701, 702, 710, 711, 712, 713, 720, 721, 730 or 731, 740, 745, 765
* Completion of PSYC 781 with "Pass"
* Completion of all courses with a minimum 3.3 G.P.A.
* Concurrent enrollment in or completion of PSYC 782 (with an ongoing caseload)
* Concurrent enrollment in or completion of PSYC 790

PSYC 604 Group Process (3)

A behavior science approach to the study of small group behavior and development; a survey of principles and theories of small group interaction with didactic and experiential focus on the dynamics of group processes in communication. This course focuses on the acquisition of foundation skills and knowledge for facilitating groups in child, adolescent and adult populations. Assessment of prospective members and ethics of group therapy are reviewed. Stages of group development, crisis management and termination are reviewed. Implications for diversity are reviewed and discussed. Intervention strategies are reviewed and discussed. Applications to practice settings are reviewed.

PSYC 606 Family Counseling (3)

This course provides an overview of the application of general systems theory to assessing, conceptualizing, and intervening with families. The course reviews several major models of family therapy and introduces attitudes and techniques from each model to support families in their effort to modify relationships. The course also examines issues of family development, including the roles of gender and culture on developing family beliefs, rituals, rules, and values. Ethics in family therapy and applications to practice settings are reviewed.

PSYC 607 Treatment of Children and Adolescents (3)

The course addresses concepts and principles of psychopathology and treatment approaches for children and adolescents. The course covers foundation counseling skills for child and adolescent populations, including therapy alliance, verbal and play approaches, group processes, therapist communication with school and family, social and cultural influences, wrap-around services, childhood exceptionalities, crisis management, and developmental and diagnostic considerations. Intervention strategies are covered from various theoretical orientations and based on recent empirical findings. In addition, qualities that contribute to an effective and ethical child or adolescent therapist/counselor are included. Multicultural competence and awareness is considered a critical component of the therapist/counselor. Empirically supported treatments are reviewed.

PSYC 608 Psychopathology (3)

Strategies for assessing and formulating clinical and cultural material are examined. Review of moderate and serious pathological and diagnostic schemas including DSM, with secondary emphasis on treatment implications. Students are introduced to symptom clusters which distinguish different mental health problems and are presented with a model for understanding diagnosis within the context of personality styles. Implications for diversity are examined.

PSYC 663 Psychometrics (3)
This course critically examines the issues related to assessing psychological characteristics and educational achievement. Reliability, validity, item analysis, units and levels of measurement theories of aptitude and intelligence, and use of multiple measures in selection, prediction, and diagnosis are explored. Properties and the application of cognitive and personality measures are addressed. Technological issues and applications as they pertain to psychological assessment are discussed. Ethical issues in assessment are explored. For students in the School Psychology certification program, this course is a prerequisite for PSYC 664 and PSYC 654.

PSYC 664 Assessment I: Cognitive (3)

Students will learn to administer, score, interpret, and report results of various measures of cognitive functioning. Multicultural assessment practices and diversity issues will be reviewed. Educational and clinical applications of individual assessment, diagnostic measures of intelligence, and observation techniques will be examined. Best practices, ethical standards, theoretical frameworks for assessment, and supplemental norm- and criterion-referenced assessment measures and techniques will be reviewed. (Prerequisites: GEN 502, PSYC 663)

PSYC 695 Clinical Psychology and Practicum Seminar (3)

Students admitted into the Psy.D. program in Clinical Psychology with a bachelor's degree must complete PSYC 695 as a 250-hour field placement, which may be combined with an academic case conference seminar. Students admitted into the Psy.D. program in Clinical Psychology with a master's degree in an unrelated field and are pursuing a master's degree in Clinical Psychology must also take PSYC 695 as a 250-hour field placement, which may be combined with an academic case conference seminar. Open only to Psy.D. students in Clinical Psychology.

PSYC 700 Biological Bases of Behavior (3)

Overview of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, brain-mind-behavior relationships; diagnostic and clinical issues. There is also a laboratory component to PSYC 700. Open only to Psy.D. students in Clinical Psychology.

PSYC 701 Cognitive and Affective Bases of Behavior (3)

Review of cognitive psychological processes and paradigms for learning, memory, sensation, decision making, perception, reasoning, and information processing. (Prerequisite: PSYC 700) Open only to Psy.D. students in Clinical Psychology.

PSYC 702 Professional Issues and Ethics (3)

Review of APA ethics code, Pennsylvania psychology and legal issues; specialty guidelines; ethics-law distinction; diversity and professional issues; practice considerations in which students are encouraged to reason through case applications of ethical dilemmas. Open only to Psy.D. students in Clinical Psychology.

PSYC 710 Cognitive and Behavioral Theories and Therapies (3)

Review of history of behavioral, cognitive, and cognitive-behavioral models, including classical and operant conditioning, integrative/eclectic approaches, and cognitive-behavioral applications. Review of relevant literature for cognitive and behavioral formulation and intervention strategies to different populations (e.g., anxiety, depression, social skills). Review of empirically supported treatments. Review of dialectal behavioral therapy. Application to practice settings are reviewed. Assessment of client-model fit is reviewed. Open only to Psy.D. students in Clinical Psychology.

PSYC 711 Psychoanalytic Theories and Therapies (3)

Study of past and current major theoretical issues and treatment strategies in psychoanalytic psychotherapy. The goal of the course is to teach students to apply psychoanalytic formulations and intervention strategies in practice settings. The course discusses major constructs in theory. A developmentally-sensitive model of diagnosis and intervention is presented. The continuum of contemporary models and traditional approaches (e.g., drive theory, ego psychology, object relations theory, self psychology) is discussed from a historical perspective, and the approaches are discussed in relation to each other. Emphasis is placed on the integration of theory, listening skills, clinical formulations, and flexible technical application of supportive-expressive to different clients and settings, including time-limited therapy environments. Therapy process research is reviewed. Implications of psychoanalytic applications to diverse client populations, including ethnic/racial, head trauma, and learning disabled, are also reviewed. Therapy process research is reviewed. (Prerequisite: PSYC 608) Open only to Psy.D. students in Clinical Psychology.

PSYC 712 Client-Centered and Relationship Theories and Therapies (3)

Course reviews basic concepts and applications of the foundations of client-centered theories and therapies. Models include Rogerian, Existential-Humanistic, and recent developments in psychotherapy that build on a client-centered foundation (e.g., Motivational Interviewing). Implications for different client problems, human diversity, ethical psychotherapy practice, and understanding the therapy process and client-therapist relationship are reviewed. The course is taught using different instructional approaches, including lectures, experiential skills practice, discussions, and group activities. Course also includes reading literature that provides empirical support for these models in ways consistent with foundational concepts. Open only to Psy.D. students in Clinical Psychology.

PSYC 713 History and Systems in Psychology (3)

Review of history and systems of psychology, and of how psychology as a profession has developed its identity. Review of history of the Ph.D. and Psy.D. models; diversity; changes in practice climate; origins of contemporary issues in practice, including managed care, information technology, current trends in professional practice, career paths; and the future of psychology. Applications to practice settings are reviewed. Open only to Psy.D. students in Clinical Psychology.

PSYC 718 Applied Statistical Analysis for Behavior Science (3)

The goals of this course include promoting the understanding of the uses of various descriptive and inferential statistics in research, including factorial and multivariate methods, and gaining a basic familiarity with the use of computers in conducting research. The course includes critical analysis of professional literature and statistical data, as well as discussion of ethical and cultural issues related to the use and interpretation of data. (Prerequisite: GEN 702). Open only to Psy.D. students in Clinical Psychology.

PSYC 720 Gender Psychology (3)

Review of the changing role of women and men in society and of the social issues which have accompanied these changes. Exploration of intrapsychic and interpersonal issues, gender bias, diversity and treatment implications. Open only to Psy.D. students in Clinical Psychology.

PSYC 721 Psychology of Human Diversity (3)

Examination of the major historical and contemporary social and cultural issues associated with all aspects of diverse populations, and of clinical strategies for addressing mental health needs of these groups. Emphasis on the role and impact of culture on structure, delivery and management of care systems; review of cultural influences and meaning of contextualization. Open only to Psy.D. students in Clinical Psychology.

PSYC 722 Human Sexuality and Dysfunctions (3)

Review of the wide range of sexual issues that may emerge in psychotherapy. Discussion of the etiological, diagnostic, treatment issues, and empirically-supported treatments related to sexual dysfunctions. Develop awareness in students of their biases, values, and areas of comfort and discomfort related to sexuality. Review of the ethical, transference/countertransference, and diversity issues related to sexuality. Open only to Psy.D. students in Clinical Psychology.

PSYC 730 Assessment IV: Advanced Skills (3)

Examines contemporary assessment issues related to research and practice; assessment competencies in diversity and professional ethics, test selection, scoring and interpretation, report writing and feedback; review of objective and personality measures through discussion and critique. Emphasis on the relationship between assessment and treatment implications for different diagnostic groups and clinical settings. (Prerequisite: PSYC 765) Open only to Psy.D. students in Clinical Psychology.

PSYC 731 Assessment V: Neuropsychological (3)

Review of strategies for assessing neuropsychological dysfunction; ethical and practice issues in neuropsychological assessment. Review of interviewing, test selection, report writing and feedback strategies. (Prerequisites: PSYC 765) Open only to Psy.D. students in Clinical Psychology. PSYC 701 may be taken concurrently.

PSYC 740 Clinical Psychopharmacology (3)

Overview of the major psychotropic agents and their interaction with the physical system; implications for diagnosis and treatment in an interdisciplinary context are reviewed. (Prerequisite: PSYC 700) Open only to Psy.D. students in Clinical Psychology.

PSYC 741 Clinical Supervision, Consultation, and Management (3)

Course addresses roles and expectations of supervisors and consultants, and program managers in clinical practice. A developmental supervision model, a consultation stage model, and issues in program leadership and personnel management are reviewed. Application of assessment, intervention, relational, diversity, ethics and outcome evaluation are reviewed. Strategic and informed approaches are discussed. The course also includes a private practice/practice management module. (Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in, within one semester of enrolling in, or have completed PSYC 780. Open only to Psy.D. students in Clinical Psychology).

PSYC 745 Social Psychology (3)

Study of the influence of social stimuli on feelings, thoughts, and behaviors. Major topics in social psychology such as conformity, persuasion, social cognition, self justification, human aggression, prejudices and intergroup conflict, affiliation and attraction are explored. Application of social psychological research in different settings. Open only to Psy.D. students in Clinical Psychology.

PSYC 765 Assessment II: Personality (3)

Introduction to personality assessment. Students learn how to use story-telling techniques and Rorschach, with emphasis on administration, scoring, interpretation and report writing skills. Course also reviews ethical and practice issues, and implications for diversity and treatment planning. (Prerequisite: PSYC 608 and 664). Open only to Psy.D. students in Clinical Psychology

PSYC 766 Advanced Neuropsychology (3)

This course advances the knowledge base and skills relevant to the practice of clinical neuropsychology. The course will increase understanding of disorders of brain-behavior relationships, specialized assessment and intervention techniques and further develop consultation skills to work effectively and ethically with referral sources and families. Prerequisite: PSYC 731. Open only to Psy.D. students in Clinical Psychology.

PSYC 767 Advanced Clinical Psychology and Practicum Seminar (3)

Students complete a 150-hour field placement under supervision. Seminar is case conference and readings. Topics include assessment, intervention, and ethical- practice issues that may arise with older clients, forensic clients, and other specific client populations; substance abuse; outcome assessment; and client-therapist relationship. Prerequisite: PSYC 695 (if required). Open to Psy.D. students. Required for students eligible for the M.A. degree in Clinical Psychology. Open to Psy.D. students in Clinical Psychology as alternative to PSYC 768 for students not eligible for the M.A. degree in Clinical Psychology. Approval of department chair and Psy.D. field site coordinator. Students interested in taking both PSYC 767 and PSYC 768 must have the chair's approval.

PSYC 768 Forensic Psychology (3)

This class covers foundational areas in forensic psychology, including ethical and legal issues, assessment, diagnostic, and intervention strategies related to the criminal justice system, relevant procedural matters, and other topics related to the practice of forensic psychology. Open to Psy.D. students in Clinical Psychology as an alternative to PSYC 767 for students not eligible for the M.A. degree in Clinical Psychology. Students interested in taking both PSYC 767 and PSYC 768 must have the chair's approval. Prerequisite: PSYC 702

PSYC 780-81 Diagnostic Practicum and Seminar I and II (3, 3)

Students must complete a minimum of 750 hours over two consecutive semesters (375, 375) and receive three credits upon successful completion of each semester’s work. The course focuses on psychological assessment skill acquisition and development. Open only to Psy.D. students in Clinical Psychology. PSYC 780-781 is led by a faculty member who is trained in clinical psychology and neuropsychology and/or school psychology. Seminar is conducted in a case conference format. Presentations include discussion of referral, background, test selection, relationship issues with the examiner, results diagnosis, and recommendations. The impact of culture and diversity on assessment and diagnosis is discussed. Test administration, scoring, and report writing are reviewed. Strategies for test feedback and ethics in testing are discussed. Presentations are accompanied by readings. Prerequisites:GEN 701, GEN 702, PSYC 663, and PSYC 664; all, or almost all other 600-level courses PSYC 700, 701, 702, 711, 713, 718, 720, 745, 765; and chair’s approval to begin PSYC 780. No student enrolled in the clinical program may do a diagnostic practicum or internship at place of employment. Questions about exceptional circumstances should be directed in writing to both the coordinator of doctoral practicum placements and the department chair.

PSYC 782-83 Psychotherapy Practicum and Seminar I and II (3, 3)

The student must complete a minimum of 750 hours over two consecutive semesters (375, 375) and receives three credits upon successful completion of each semester’s work. The course focuses on therapy skill acquisition and development. Open only to Psy.D. students in Clinical Psychology. Seminar is conducted in a case-conference format. Presentations highlight the relationship that exists among client, therapist, treatment setting, diagnosis, and the student’s preferred therapeutic approach. Students identify readings for the group to accompany presentations. The influence of early development, family, later life development, culture and diversity, ethics and realistic treatment goals on case formulation are integrated into the presentation. Empirically supported treatments are discussed. Prerequisites: PSYC 780 prerequisites, and all 600-level courses, PSYC 781, PSYC 710, 712, 721, 730 or 731; and chair’s approval to begin PSYC 782. No student enrolled in the clinical program may do a therapy practicum at place of employment. Questions about exceptional circumstances should be directed in writing to both the coordinator of doctoral practicum placements and department chair.

PSYC 786, 787, 788, 791, 792, 793 Predoctoral Internship in Clinical Psychology (9)

Students complete APA-accredited and/or APPIC member predoctoral internships, which provide the intern with advanced level supervised clinical experiences and training. This clinical training includes the synthesis of knowledge and skills acquired through coursework and practica, in addition to development of professional roles and identity. Students may not complete an internship at their place of employment. Open only to Psy.D. students in Clinical Psychology. Students meet with the predoctoral internship coordinator approximately 16 months prior to the year that they anticipate beginning their internship. Predoctoral internships begin between July and September. Students completing internships enroll in the six courses distributed across the internship; the predoctoral internship coordinator assists students in determining this sequencing based on the interns’ start and end dates. Students complete a minimum of 1,800 hours across this nine-credit course sequence.

(Prerequisites: All coursework, including dissertation defense, and comprehensive exams; and departmental approval) Grading is “Pass” or “Fail”.

PSYC 798-800 Doctoral Dissertation (3, 3, 3)

Student completes dissertation. Grading is "Pass" or "Fail." Students are required to begin dissertation in the fall semester and must register for consecutive semesters of dissertation. (Prerequisite: PSYC 790 and chair’s approval). PSYC 798 involves completion of the dissertation proposal (summer semester). PSYC 799 involves data collection and analysis (fall semester). PSYC 800 involves the preparation of the final draft and dissertation defense (spring semester). Throughout the dissertation process, the student works closely with his or her dissertation chair and has regular contacts with two other committee members. Only full-time faculty are eligible to serve as dissertation chairs. See Dissertation Handbook for further details. Open only to Psy.D. students in Clinical Psychology.

PSYC 000 Dissertation Continuation

Required for students who have completed PSYC 798, 799 and 800 but need additional time to complete the dissertation process. See the section on Continuous Registration in the Graduate Catalog.

 


Immaculata University | 1145 King Road, Immaculata, PA. 19345 | p. 610-647-4400 or call toll-free: 1-877-42 TODAY
Immaculata University is a Catholic, comprehensive, coeducational institution founded by the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary.
Copyright ©2012 All Rights Reserved | Federal Compliance Links | Clery